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Press

Great Press for TarBaby’s Off-Broadway run at the DR2 Theatre in NYC, January 5-19, 2013:

“smart, original, refreshing, and maybe even necessary.” - The New Yorker

Both Entertaining and Startling… Tar Baby [is] more than just a comic riff on race. Burch’s stories make us laugh and even feel.” – Backstage

“funny… kinetic showmanship” – NY Times

“Kudos to the singularly amazing energy of Desiree Burch for making this show relevant and engrossing throughout.” – NYTheatre.com

“[Burch] proves [to be] a dynamic performer, fast enough on her feet to be wittily funny… amusing and thoughtful” – NY Post

“brilliant, frequently hilarious, and [a] poignant experience… Once you touch the “tar baby,” it sticks with you.” -TheatreIsEasy.com

 

Theatre review: 52 Man Pickup

4/54/54/54/5
by Fiona Shepherd | The Scotsman
Published: 18/8/2011

 

IT CAN be tedious enough listening to someone talking about one of their sexual conquests, let alone one for every card in the deck. But New York-based performer Desiree Burch is such a funny, frank, eloquent, entertaining and perceptive raconteur that it was a pleasure, of sorts, to hear all the gory, explicit details of her ample carnal encounters in 52 Man Pickup.

Burch didn’t lose her virginity until she was in her twenties but made up for lost time on her arrival in New York. These days her diverse record of sexual experiences makes Sex and the City seem like a Disney production.

Each card in her pack corresponds to a different individual she has slept with, their performance/relationship rated according to the number on the card. Aces high, of course. Plus more than her fair share of jokers.

Burch then plays a succession of card games and whichever cards come up determines the shagging stories she will share. So each performance of the show will be slightly different, according to how the cards fall. It’s a contrived device but Burch ensures a seamless flow of anecdotes.

For all the hilarity she finds in her predicaments, some of her character appraisals are positively poetic in their insight. Others are simply pithy – “never trust an Elvis Costello fan” is her advice. Yet she’s a helpless fool when it comes to guys called Dave, so Daves beware – or start queuing.

Burch is a force of nature, utterly upfront (that’s a tight corset she’s poured herself into) about her preferences but also her vulnerabilities. She expects a little quid pro quo and attempts to coax sexual revelations from her audience. By the time she demands some (harmless) participation from the guys then the girls, you will feel you know her sufficiently well to comply with her wishes. There’s even a special prize for the lucky lady who wins the final showdown.

Edinburgh Festival Fringe